New NREL Report Explores Solar Securitization

Generalized solar securitization transaction. Green arrows represent cash flows, blue arrows indicate structuring

Generalized solar securitization transaction. Green arrows represent cash flows, blue arrows indicate structuring

The U.S. solar industry is an $11.5 billion market with over 360,000 systems in place . Since 2008, solar capacity additions have exhibited a compound annual growth rate of over 50%, with strong gains anticipated in the coming years.

As the industry grows, it is exploring alternative financing options outside of its traditional funding sources (namely debt, tax equity, and cash equity). Securitization—the process of structuring an illiquid asset into a liquid and tradable one (i.e., a security)—represents an emerging opportunity for the distributed solar market in particular. Access to the capital markets through security issuance can assist the solar market in achieving greater liquidity among investors and an advantageous cost of capital relative to traditional funding sources (namely debt, tax equity, and sponsor equity). Liquidity and lower financing rates have both proven somewhat elusive given solar’s current reliance on project financing and tax equity structures.

A new report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, The Potential of Securitization in Solar PV Finance, explores this capital market finance option for PV assets. The report provides a general overview of the securitization process (see diagram above), the actors involved, the benefits (and risks), and the rationale for pursuing this kind of funding strategy.

The report also offers a high-level analysis of the volumes of solar deployment that could be supported given a single securities offering. It posits that a single $100 million securitization transaction (not accounting for fees, overcollateralization, and other structuring/transactional costs) could potentially support 72 MW of residential solar assets, or 100 MW of commercial, or 133 MW of large commercial and industrial (C&I) projects.



Categories: Economic Indicators, Solar

Tags: ,